GLF Schools

GLF Schools

GLF Schools was founded in 2012 in order to enable the federation of Glyn School (an academy in 2011) and Danetree Junior School. Together, we began our journey to become a MAT of more than 1000 talented staff working with over 10,000 children in 40 schools across 5 regions in southern England.

Extended curriculum

Inclusion quote

Inclusive education – also called inclusion – is education that includes everyone, with non-disabled and disabled people (including those with “special educational needs”) learning together in mainstream schools. Inclusive practice can be defined as attitudes and methods that ensure all learners can access mainstream education. At Meridian High School, everyone works to make sure all learners feel welcome and valued, and that they get the right support to help them develop their talents and achieve their goals. We believe that when education is truly inclusive it can actually benefit all learners.

At Meridian High School we have carefully designed an extended curriculum to ensure that students have a personalised provision that will meet their needs in the most effective way. The alternative curriculum supports students for literacy and language, neurological differences and social, emotional, mental health. 

Extended curriculum sessions

Literacy and language

Literacy quote

Intent

At Meridian High School, our ambition is to become a centre of excellence where all students are supported and encouraged to be effective communicators verbally and in writing. We aim to challenge all students to use Standard English and high level vocabulary as tools to present the best version of themselves in education and beyond. We strive to ensure that our students are avid readers of both fiction and non-fiction texts and our goal is to foster a love of reading for pleasure.

Learning hours

Language and literacy are integral across the curriculum and so are used and supported throughout every faculty. There are withdrawal sessions for students with specific, identified literacy and language needs, who need additional support.

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

Literacy skills

National Trust Article linked to the literacy needs of GCSE students 

https://medium.com/national-literacy-trust/help-your-students-master-the-new-gcse-literacy-demands-6557fff54ae3

Assessment 

Whole school, reading ages are assessed each year using the NGRT. This then informs teacher planning and some withdrawal sessions.

Learning and progress is assessed in withdrawal sessions through baseline testing prior to withdrawals beginning and then periodic retesting.

Feedback

Feedback is predominantly given live to students verbally, during lessons and withdrawals. Marking for key words and SPaG is also done on the school ‘Marking Sheets’. Summative assessment data is also used for feedback to students so they can see their progress.

Learning beyond the classroom

Outside of the classroom, literacy and language can be explored and developed through attending any of our extra-curricular clubs, as they promote communication and oracy. Additionally, reading for pleasure, including Strand 3 of Prep, will greatly improve students’ reading, comprehension and vocabulary. We will shortly be reopening and relaunching our school library and there will be plenty of opportunities to partake in reading clubs and competitions.

 

Lego Therapy 

Lego therapy helps teen in coping with Asperger's syndrome | Entertainment  | tulsaworld.com

The Lego Therapy group provides students within a small group environment to improve their social communication difficulties. The intervention encourages students to develop their communication and problem solving skills that will be transferable to all circumstances in and outside of school.

SEND 7

Intent 

Lego Therapy group aims to give neurodiverse students the position to explore collaborative communication in an encouraging and positive way. The intention of Lego Therapy is for students to engage with peers, share experiences and collaborate through simple and repeatable activities; these will develop transferable skills that can impact on everyday life and improve the well-being of neurodiverse students.

Learning hours

Intervention groups happen throughout the week but students will have 1 hour per week. 

  All year groups 
Knowledge and Understanding 
  • Using descriptive terminology
  • Following rules
  • Taking and demonstrating and active role within a team
Skills 
  • How to communicate instructions to others
  • Patience, turn-taking and listening skills
  • How to be resilient

Specification

https://courses.bluchildrensclub.co.uk/

Assessment 

Staff will make observations and monitor progress among students during the sessions.

Feedback

Students will receive verbal feedback on the skills they use during their sessions.

Learning beyond the classroom

Students will have the tools to adapt their life and social skills that will provide them with the ability to communicate and collaborate effectively. These skills will help them progress in other subjects at school and develop interpersonal skills - advancing employment opportunities and improving mental health.

 

Home cooking 

Tom Read Wilson mini chocolate and orange curd cakes recipe on Celebrity  Best Home Cook – The Talent Zone

Home Cooking aims to give our students the knowledge, skills and confidence to enjoy cooking meals at home. The students will gain an understanding of how to economise when planning meals to cook at home. The intervention will encourage learners to transfer skills learnt to other recipes to continue cooking for themselves and their families and to inspire others by passing on their knowledge. This alternative subject is taught on the proposition that being able to cook is an essential life skill which empowers people to make changes that have benefits to health and wellbeing.

The students will be introduced to basic cooking skills within a smaller learning environment by following recipes for simple dishes and learning how to use kitchen equipment safely. Each recipe is underpinned with knowledge about sourcing food, nutrition, hygiene and food safety where relevant. The students are encouraged to plan, prepare and produce a range of sweet and savoury dishes.  During the intervention, the students will be asked to demonstrate their skills by following a recipe. They will also consider the value of acquiring skills for cooking at home and explore ways to pass on their knowledge of cooking skills to others.

Intent 

The curriculum intent for Home Cooking is to provide students with a basic knowledge to independently and confidently cook a range of food. Home Cooking aims for students to gain an awareness and understanding of food hygiene, health and safety in the kitchen, different types of food and encourage independence and confidence in the kitchen environment.

Learning hours

1 hour per week which is a combination of practical and theoretical content.

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  All year groups
Topics 
  • Introduction to Food and the kitchen
  • The value of learning home cooking skills
  • Importance of Personal Hygiene when cooking
  • Food Safety and Hygiene
  • Health & Safety in the Kitchen
  • Kitchen knowledge including tools and equipment
  • Plan, prepare and cook wide range of sweet and savoury dishes.
  • Health and Nutrition – balanced meals and healthy eating
  • Food economy
Knowledge and understanding
  • Be able to use cooking skills to make homecooked food that does not use pre-prepared, ready cooked food.
  • Understand the value of passing on information about home cooking.
  • Be able to plan a nutritious, homecooked meal using basic ingredients.
  • Be able to prepare, cook and present a nutritious, homecooked meal using basic ingredients.
  • Understand how to cook economically at home.
  • Be able to pass on information about cooking meals at home from scratch
Skills
  • Independence
  • Time-management
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Thinking skills
  • Communication and participation
  • Ability to use different types of kitchen equipment and to use different cooking techniques
  • Knife skills when cutting different types of foods
  • To build self confidence and independence skills.

Specification

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/btec-home-cooking-skills/2010/Specification-and-sample-assessments/BA033235-BTEC-Splt-L12-HCS-Issue-2.pdf

Assessment 

The students can be assessed, stretched and challenged in this alternative subject through the use of different assessment strategies, for example:

  • using a variety of stems in questions — for example analyse, evaluate, discuss, compare
  • ensuring connectivity between sections of questions
  • performance observations and written teacher witness statements of students' practical home cooking skills.
  • an opportunity for extended writing, presentations, projects and practical/written tests.
  • use of a wider range of question types to address different skills — for example open-ended questions, realistic case studies/scenarios.

Feedback

Written feedback will be regularly provided in the students' books by marking their work to assess their learning and progress of the lesson. Students' work will be checked carefully to ensure that the work is their own and is not copied from source material or from each other. This is to eliminate any forms of plagiarism in preparation for further education. The students will have an opportunity to respond to the teacher’s written feedback in their books to embed their knowledge and understanding of the topic previously discussed.

The students will also receive constant verbal feedback during practical and theoretical lessons to assess their learning and to address any misconceptions that the students may have.

SEND 6

Learning beyond the classroom

The students could have an opportunity to visit to the local shops to buy their ingredients for their recipe to promote self-development, confidence and independence. It will also help to develop students’ budgeting and money skills.

 

Health and Social care

Health & Social Care (Single or Double A Level) - The English Martyrs  Catholic School and Sixth Form College

Health and Social Care gives our students opportunities to actively engage in the processes of health and social care in order to develop as effective and independent students. It helps our students to understand aspects of personal development, and the health, social care and early years sectors, through investigation and evaluation of a range of services and organisations available to help and support people in their lives.

It encourages our students to develop a critical and analytical approach to problem solving within this subject where they can examine and explore issues which affect the nature and quality of human life, including an appreciation of diversity and cultural issues. The students will be given the opportunity to develop their awareness of the influences on an individual’s health and wellbeing as well as an understanding of the importance of motivation and support when improving health.

The Health & Social Care experience provides our students with a small learning group environment enabling them to focus on developing and improving their social communication skills and their problem-solving and thinking skills. These are valuable transferable life skills for the students to learn and develop.

Intent

The curriculum intent is for our students to be provided with valuable opportunities and to learn different topics relating to Health & Social Care and how they relate to their lives and to society. Health & Social Care aims to promote this subject as an enjoyable and interesting alternative subject.  The students will be informed of the teacher’s high expectations and aspirations in obtaining their target grades and above so that they aspire to reach their full academic and well-being potential whilst securing valuable transferable life skills.

Learning hours

1 hour per week for students who study this. 

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  All year groups
Topics covered 
  • The stages and patterns of human growth and development
  • The different factors that can affect human growth and development
  • The development of self-concept and personal relationships
  • Major life changes and how people manage the effects of these
  • The role of relationships in personal development.
Knowledge and understanding 

Health, social care and early years practitioners need to understand the different ways people grow and develop during their lives. This unit focuses on human growth and development across the whole lifespan. Students are expected to be able to describe and explain the patterns of physical growth and change, and the physical, social, intellectual and emotional development that typically take place in each life stage. The unit will also develop knowledge and understanding of patterns of human growth and development.

 

  • To develop knowledge and understanding of how individual grows and develops over the lifespan.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of the factors which affect growth and development.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of the effect of relationships on personal development.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of the importance of the self concept
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of the effects of life events on personal development.
Skills
  • Effective Communication Skills - How to effectively communicate with others
  • To develop active listening skills
  • To develop their thinking skills
  • To develop their problem-solving skills
  • To develop patience
  • To develop their turn-taking skills
  • To develop their ability to become more resilient as a learner
  • To build self confidence and independence skills.

Specification

https://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/Health%20and%20Social%20Care/2009/Specification%20and%20sample%20assessments/UG029965_GCSE_in_Health_and_Social_Care_Spec.pdf

Assessment 

The students can be assessed, stretched and challenged in this alternative subject through the use of different assessment strategies, for example:

  • using a variety of stems in questions — for example analyse, evaluate, discuss, compare
  • ensuring connectivity between sections of questions
  • opportunity for extended writing
  • use of a wider range of question types to address different skills — for example open-ended questions, case studies.

Feedback

Written feedback will be regularly provided in students' books by marking their work to assess their learning and progress of the lesson. Students' work will be checked carefully to ensure that the work is their own and is not copied from source material or from each other. This is to eliminate any forms of plagiarism in preparation for further education. The students will have an opportunity to respond to the teacher’s written feedback in their books to embed their knowledge and understanding of the topic previously discussed.

The students will also receive verbal feedback during lessons to assess their learning and to address any misconceptions that the students may have.

Learning beyond the classroom

Our students will learn to function as well-informed individuals after they leave school. This alternative subject gives our students an opportunity/experience to have cultural and social capital input by helping and supporting them to access their learning and enabling them to make well-informed decisions so that they can succeed academically and have positive life chances.

 

Personal Finance

10 Things That Matter Most In Personal Finance | White Coat Investor

Finance provides students with the opportunity to learn financial skills and develop their mathematical skills. The Finance intervention encourages an understanding of money and finance and develops skills and knowledge for everyday life.

Intent

There are numerous benefits of financial education in schools, such as introducing positive financial habits at an impressionable time, preparing students for the workforce or part-time work in college and endowing students with vital expertise that can guide their financial decisions throughout life.

Learning hours

1 hour across Years 7 – 10 with selected small groups (average 3 – 4 students)

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  Year groups 7-10
Topics

Wages, Deductions,  Pay Slips

Knowledge and understanding 
  • Knowledge of money and banking
  • Financial literacy classes teach students the basics of money management: budgeting, saving, debt, investing, giving and more.
  • That knowledge lays a foundation for students to build strong money habits early on and avoid many of the mistakes that lead to lifelong money struggles.
Skills
  • Mathematical operations
  • Problem – Solving Skills
  • Money Management
  • Budgeting

Specification

https://qualifications.pearson.com/en/qualifications/myskills/btec-money-and-finance-skills.html

Assessment 

Students have regular opportunities for peer and self-assessment as well as completing a big quiz every half term.

Feedback

Students regularly receive verbal feedback during the sessions as well as formal written feedback.

Learning beyond the classroom

The intention is to give students the opportunity to manage a small financial project where they will need to work as a team and use budgeting skills.

Forest School

Home | Inside Holt Country Park's new forest school

Forest School provides students with exciting and unique activities to develop skills and knowledge through practical learning. The intervention offers students the opportunity to take supported risks appropriate to the environment and to themselves.

Intent 

The Forest School intervention aims to develop, where appropriate, the physical, social, cognitive, linguistic, emotional, social and spiritual aspects of the learner. This progressive course provides students with practical activities that focus on building resilience and self-regulation.

Learning hours

1 hour per week - a combination of theoretical and practical content.

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  All year groups
Topics 
  • Fire making
  • Cooking
  • Whittling
  • Shelter building
  • Arts & Craft
  • First Aid
Knowledge and understanding 
  • Knowledge of fire making equipment.
  • Outdoors cooking equipment and activities.
  • Understanding how to safely use whittling equipment and tools.
  • Knowledge of how to build outdoor shelters.
Skills
  • Develop self-regulation and self-esteem
  • Social skills
  • Language and communication
  • Build resilience
  • Gain a sense of achievement
  • Increase motivation and concentration
  • Improve problem solving

Specification

https://thehive-kids.com/

Assessment 

To ensure that students are making progress the teacher will assess through observation and completion of key tasks as well as student reflections. 

Feedback

Feedback takes place through both verbal and personalised written targets.

SEND 8

Learning beyond the classroom

Students will learn and develop lifelong skills that could encourage them in discovering their own hobbies and interests. By undertaking Forest School activities, students will develop a better understanding of the outdoors and take ownership and pride in their local environment.

 

ASDAN

Gardening Courses - Learn Garden Design from home - Open Study College

Asdan offers a wide choice of activity based opportunities for learners working at a range of levels. This also provides the flexibility to work with the students' strengths.   

Intent 

To engage students through relevant and motivating courses to help boost engagement and develop core skills to achieve meaningful learning outcomes.  The Asdan course has been developed as an accessible and practical pedagogy for learners, which elevates them to go on to further education, training and work, and empowers them to take control of their lives.

Learning hours

2 – 3 hours a week with Year 10 and 11 selective students

Knowledge, Understanding and Skills

  Year 10 and 11 
Topics covered

Learners complete challenges and collate the work they produce in a portfolio of evidence, along with their student book and recording documents.

The Key Steps learner guide shows what learners need to do to complete the programme.

Students must complete 30 hours of challenges to achieve each certificate. Students may achieve up to three certificates.

Challenges can be selected from any of the nine modules:

  • Identity
  • Community
  • Health
  • Citizenship
  • Environment
  • Personal Finance
  • Enterprise
  • Values
  • International
Knowledge and understanding 
  • Working With Others
  • Improving Own Learning and Performance
  • Problem Solving
Skills
  • They are presented in the form of personal challenges and encourage students to develop their personal skills and take responsibility for their own learning.

Specification

https://www.asdan.org.uk/secondary-schools/

Assessment 

After each challenge students are given verbal feedback from the teacher – there is no end of course exam. Students produce a student portfolio that is externally moderated at the end of the 2 year course.

Feedback

Mixture of verbal and formal written feedback. Pupil self and peer assessment opportunities.

SEND 9

Learning beyond the classroom

ASDAN courses are designed to develop skills for learning, work and life, with practical and accessible pedagogy. They help young learners discover their passion and purpose as they move forward into further education, work or training.